Multi-sector Strategy…for Social Innovation

  In her JustMeans Blog post, Sangeeta Haindl, suggests,  “There is huge support for collaborative, multi-sector processes focused on modest initiatives,” which are aimed at “helping shape the planet’s future.”  While Social Change is hard work, the work of loan individuals does matter- and the mantra ‘individual efforts, can make big changes’ prevails.     If corporate America, and multi-nationals can embrace the ‘small’ over their usual M.O.’s for bigger and bigger profits  and bring their considerable resources to the social change table for ‘good’ – ‘one company’s stewardship efforts, can make big changes in our planet’s sustainable future.’       … Continue reading Multi-sector Strategy…for Social Innovation

Beyond CSR to the new ‘PPP’: Public+Private+Philanthropy…”How Companies Can Move Beyond Philanthropy in Developing Countries?”

                        More from Kay’s article: “For years the developed world’s standard M.O. has been to fund philanthropic projects in poorer countries across the globe. The results overall are mixed and have certainly been controversial. But despite one’s views of the “donor community” and whether one believes that charity and aid are effective, the stubborn fact is that needs have become greater, costs more expensive and for philanthropies and foundations, the funds must be stretched even further.”     DWBDG asks: Can companies move beyond brand pumping CSR initiatives to … Continue reading Beyond CSR to the new ‘PPP’: Public+Private+Philanthropy…”How Companies Can Move Beyond Philanthropy in Developing Countries?”

Social Entrepreneurs in Africa: Let “Trickle Out” Know Where You Are! Directory, Coming Soon….

The Trickle Out Research project is busy compiling a Directory of 19 countries in Eastern and Southern Africa, specifically:  Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Democratic Republic of Congo, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, Seychelles, South Africa, Swaziland, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia, and Zimbabwe The need arises from only a small footprint of Microfinance in the region, and what NextBillion determines as the prime Socent focus in the Global South being trained on India. The purpose: (From the Trickle Out website): The primary objectives of this study are to: (a) identify examples of social and environmental enterprises in the Southern Africa … Continue reading Social Entrepreneurs in Africa: Let “Trickle Out” Know Where You Are! Directory, Coming Soon….

Can Pay Toilets Save Lives?

….the transformation, restoration and sustainability of social dignity in our ever growing urban population. Providing pay toilets in schools, slums and cities may not seem like a revolutionary idea. But when you consider that 2.5 billion people lack access to adequate sanitation and that 1.5 million children perish annually as a result- and that 2008 marked the year when 50% of the population resides in cities (which could rise to 5 billion in 2030 per UNFPA)- it’s literally a life saving concept with great future implications. This is why, Ecotact, provider of the Ikotoilet, describes its mission as going beyond … Continue reading Can Pay Toilets Save Lives?

Is the “Micro Consignment Model” The New Micro-Financing Model (that Traditional Investors Have Been Waiting For?)

First there was Micro-Finance, connecting the ‘unbankable’ and traditionally un-collateralized to sources of credit that could be leveraged into their own businesses or micro-enterprises. If, however, some loanees were not able to develop businesses, or scale, or sustain them, they were left with outstanding debts, that when difficult to repay resulted in default.  Not an attractive social entrepreneurial (socent) model for traditional investment. Although an incredible boon to individuals in developing countries, especially to women, and a testament to innovation in the socent and social capital arenas. Enter, Micro-Franchising. It adds an already existent product or service to sell by the “entrepreneur” … Continue reading Is the “Micro Consignment Model” The New Micro-Financing Model (that Traditional Investors Have Been Waiting For?)

Pumps with Purpose: KickStarting Families Out of Poverty

The Number One Need of the Poor is a Way to Make Money. Everyone today lives in a cash economy. When you have cash, you can get food, water, shelter, medicine, and other basic necessities. If you don’t, you can’t. It is that simple. The cause of poverty is a lack of money, so what a poor person needs most is a way to make more money. WHY WE SELL OUR TOOLS? “Wouldn’t it be better to just give your pumps away?” This is a question we get asked a lot. By “better” people usually mean, “less expensive” or “more effective”. The … Continue reading Pumps with Purpose: KickStarting Families Out of Poverty